Suni

distribution of suni
Names, conservation status and distribution
suni, wildlife of kenya
Karura forest, Nairobi
suni, wildlife of kenya
Karura Forest, Nairobi
suni, wildlife of kenya, Nicolas Urlacher
Nairobi
suni, wildlife of kenya
Nairobi National Park

The Suni (Neotragus moschatus) is a small antelope. It occurs in dense underbrush from central Kenya to KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa. Suni are around 30–43 cm high at the shoulder and weigh 4.5–5.4 kg. They are usually reddish brown, darker on their back than their sides and legs. Males have horns 8–13 cm long, that are ridged most of their length and curve backwards close to their heads. Females do not have horns. Suni can make weak barking and whistling sounds.

 

Suni feed on leaves, fungi, fruits and flowers, and need almost no free water. They are shy, most active at night, and sleep during the day in a shady, sheltered area. They are social but males defend a territory of about three hectares. They scent-mark the boundaries with secretions from their preorbital glands. There may be an individual or communal dung pile on the periphery of the territory. A male usually takes one mate, but other females may share his territory. A single calf is born weighing about two pounds, after a gestation of 183 days.

 

Lions, birds of prey, snakes, and other meat-eaters prey on suni. For protection, they are well camouflaged in dry grass and keep very still. When a predator is almost on top of them, they spring out and bound away into the underbrush.

 

Source : Wikipedia