Mosque Swallow

mosque swallow, hirondelle des mosquées, golondrina senegalesa
Names and conservation status
mosque swallow, hirondelle des mosquées, golondrina senegalesa, Nicolas Urlacher, wildlife of kenya, birds of africa, birds of kenya
Nakuru National Park
mosque swallow, hirondelle des mosquées, golondrina senegalesa, Nicolas Urlacher, wildlife of kenya, birds of africa, birds of kenya
Nakuru National Park

mosque swallow, hirondelle des mosquées, golondrina senegalesa, Nicolas Urlacher, wildlife of kenya, birds of africa, birds of kenya
Champagne ridge
mosque swallow, hirondelle des mosquées, golondrina senegalesa, Nicolas Urlacher, wildlife of kenya, birds of africa, birds of kenya
Champagne ridge
mosque swallow, hirondelle des mosquées, golondrina senegalesa, Nicolas Urlacher, wildlife of kenya, birds of africa, birds of kenya
Champagne ridge
mosque swallow, hirondelle des mosquées, golondrina senegalesa, Nicolas Urlacher, wildlife of kenya, birds of africa, birds of kenya
Champagne ridge
mosque swallow, hirondelle des mosquées, golondrina senegalesa, Nicolas Urlacher, wildlife of kenya, birds of africa, birds of kenya
Champagne ridge

The mosque swallow (Cecropis senegalensis) is a large swallow. It is a resident breeder in much of sub-Saharan Africa, although most common in the west. It does not migrate but follows the rains to some extent. The mosque swallow is found from southern Mauritania and Senegal east to western South Sudan then south to Namibia, northern Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, and north-eastern South Africa.

 

The mosque swallow feed on flying insects such as ants, termite alates and flies, normally foraging 2–30 m above the ground. It is attracted to termite emergence events and bush fires when it can gather in flocks of up to 30 birds. It has a slow rather falcon-like flight with a lot of gliding and often forages high above the woodland canopy in association with other hirundines and swifts.

 

The mosque swallow nests either solitarily or in small groups. The nest is a made of mud pellets and lined with grass and feathers. Its shape is that of a gourd and it has a long entrance tunnel attached to the side. The nest is often situated in a tree cavity, very often in a baobab, but also in or under tree branches, in buildings or road culverts. They breed all year round, with a peak of breeding activity in August–April. The clutch is 2-4 eggs.

 

Source : wikipedia